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Christian university president defends student newspaper's right to publish Obama endorsement

(11/05/12 5:22pm)

We write a lot about principals and college administrators who don't seem to appreciate the value of a free and vigorous student press, so it's nice to write about one who does — Abilene Christian University President Phil Schubert. Last week, the editorial board of the school's student newspaper, The Optimist, endorsed President Barack Obama for a second term. The endorsement sparked debate on the newspaper's website, where some wondered whether the endorsement was at odds with the school's Christian mission. Sunday in the Abilene Reporter-News, Schubert publicly defended the paper's right to publish its endorsement: Abilene Christian University does not endorse political candidates or parties, so some people reacted with surprise when our student newspaper, the Optimist, recently endorsed a presidential candidate. That provides a great opportunity for me to explain what ACU does endorse: making sure our students receive an education that prepares them to make real choices and engage in independent thought about important issues. ... It would be easy to shy away from diverse opinions about difficult subjects, but in so doing, we would remove from our students the opportunity to practice — in a safe environment — for the challenges and experiences that will shape them into these kind of people. Well said.



College administrator who wanted student newspaper to pay him for interviews is out

(11/13/12 5:30pm)

A Texas college administrator who last year wanted reporters at a San Antonio College's student newspaper to pay him in exchange for interviews is no longer is employed. The relationship between former student life director Jorge Posadas and The Ranger has long been rocky.




Do college newspaper archives matter? Ask Cory Booker.

(01/11/13 7:41pm)

Hundreds of times a year, phones ring in newsrooms across the country, college and professional alike, with a variation of: "Your archives are ruining my life!" With decades-old back editions being digitized into online-searchable form, youthful indiscretions that seemed to have disappeared into obscurity are Googling their way back into view.




Missouri high school junior arrested for yearbook prank

(05/31/13 3:37pm)

Kaitlyn Booth, 17, a junior at Hickman High School in Columbia, Mo., was arrested earlier this month after a prank in which she she changed a student's last name to "Masturbate" in the 2013 yearbook. Booth faces charges of harassment as well as first-degree property damage, a felony, in addition to unspecified school punishment. The name change is found on page 270 of the yearbook, the page that features the index.


Texas high school yearbook recalled after "Ugly Hoe" caption discovered

(06/03/13 7:53pm)

On the heels of another high school yearbook prank, Irving High School in Irving, Tex., recalled every copy of the 2012-13 yearbook last week after realizing that a student’s name had been changed to “Ugly Hoe” in a photo caption, the Dallas Observer reported. The person who changed the student’s name has not yet been identified, said Lesley Weaver, the school district's director of communications. “We can speculate, but we don’t know definitively,” Weaver said.


Q&A: Washington student editor discusses paper's in-depth focus on much-criticized community

(06/05/13 11:38am)

“Skyway is ghetto” — the provocative headline of Renton High School’s student newspaper led readers into an issue that worked to open their minds to the Seattle, Wash.-suburb Skyway as a whole, including the more pleasant parts that stereotypes often refuse to acknowledge. The 22-member Arrow staff put out an impressive 40-page May issue in which staff members explored the neighborhood — from its bus line to its park to its middle school.


Professional journalist speaks out in favor of students as New Jersey school board reconsiders prior review policy

(07/22/13 4:25pm)

Discussion and disagreement over a New Jersey high school’s prior review policy has moved a professional journalist to speak out on behalf of student journalists. Adviser Thomas McHale, who oversaw Hunterdon Central Regional High School’s student newspaper for a decade, resigned in May after school officials started enforcing the district’s prior review policy.


Red & Black board agrees to give student board members voting rights

(08/12/13 4:19pm)

A year ago this week, staff of The Red & Black walked out in protest of policies they believed threatened student editorial control. For several days, students and the board of directors, which runs the independent nonprofit newspaper, found themselves at an impasse — culminating with a tense "open house" meeting where the paper's then-general manager got in an altercation with a student journalist covering the event.




Obama's nominee to lead the Fed used to lead her student newspaper

(10/09/13 3:34pm)

Janet Yellen, President Obama's nominee for Federal Reserve chair, once interviewed herself for her high school newspaper. She was its editor-in-chief and school valedictorian. "Next year I will attend Pembroke College where I’ve decided to major in math or anthropology or economics," the 1963 graduating senior said in her own interview.