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California high school journalists honored after invoking state shield law

(02/26/14 6:55pm)

A trio of student journalists who fought to protect confidential sources while investigating events surrounding a peer’s suicide earned recognition this month from the Northern California chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. The team from Saratoga High School’s The Saratoga Falcon — Samuel Liu, Sabrina Chen and Cristina Curcelli — were honored in the high school category of the James Madison Freedom of Information Awards.


Schools and administrators among those “honored” by Jefferson Muzzle awards

(04/09/14 7:23pm)

The Thomas Jefferson Center for the Protection of Free Expression is out with its 2014 Jefferson Muzzles, the annual award it presents to those that "forgot or disregarded Mr. Jefferson's admonition that freedom of speech 'cannot be limited without being lost.'" As usual, quite a few schools and administrators were recognized with awards. Among the honorees: The University of Kansas board of regents: After a journalism professor tweeted about the National Rifle Association following the September 2013 Naval Yard shooting, he was placed on administrative leave by the university.



Neshaminy newspaper adviser named Pennsylvania journalism teacher of the year

(06/11/14 12:00pm)

The last few months for the students of Neshaminy High School’s The Playwickian haven’t been easy. As the student staff has fought administrators for editorial control, their adviser Tara Huber has stood behind them at every step. Tuesday night, Huber found out she was being named Journalism Teacher of the Year by the Pennsylvania High School Press Association.“It makes it worth continuing to fight the good fight,” Huber said.In October, the staff announced they wouldn’t use the word Redskin – the school’s mascot – because they say it’s a racial slur. Administrators pushed back and demanded students print it.


School censorship elevates Mich. students' message to the national stage

(05/24/14 12:00pm)

Blocked by school censors from sharing a thoughtful discussion of mental-health issues in the pages of the Community High School student newspaper, two Ann Arbor, Mich., teens were forced instead to settle for The New York Times and NPR's "Weekend Edition."Proving once again that censorship is gasoline on the flame of a powerful idea, journalists Madeline Halpert and Eva Rosenfeld talked with NPR's Scott Simon today about how they were prevented from publishing a column examining the effects of depression on teens and why it's so hard for them to talk about.Halpert was one of several students who agreed, with written parental permission, to be named in a story confronting the stigma surrounding mental illness that can, with tragic consequences, deter people struggling with depression from seeking professional help.


Supreme Court declines to hear First Amendment challenge over school’s American flag clothing ban

(03/30/15 1:27pm)

A petition to the nation’s highest court followed a February 2014 ruling from three judges on the Ninth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals in California, who found Live Oak High School officials did not violate the First Amendment when they ordered students to remove American flag T-shirts during a Cinco de Mayo celebration in 2010.