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New press law guide available for student media

(01/01/00 12:00am)

The Newspaper Association of America Foundation and the Student Press Law Center have produced "The Starting Point: Young Journalists and the Law," a guide to the special legal and ethical issues involved when journalists are minors and when journalists interview sources who are minors. The 41-page guide includes a review of legal and ethical issues in easy-to-understand language, along with related exercises, suggestions and recommendations.




Mass. student expelled for bathroom wall death threats sues school for $75 million

(01/01/00 12:00am)

A former Massachusetts high school student who was expelled about a month after the Columbine High School shootings for allegedly writing death threats on a school bathroom wall has sued school officials for $75 million. The parents of former Sandwich High School student James Sullivan, 17, filed suit in federal court on their son's behalf in December alleging that the school failed to stop more than two years of harassment that led to the death threats.


Late May hearing expected in Kentucky State University censorship case

(02/01/00 12:00am)

The U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals said that it anticipates oral arguments in Kincaid v. Gibson will be scheduled for late May. The case involves the confiscation of all copies of the 1993-94 student yearbook by school officials and the transfer of the newspaper adviser to a secretarial position after she refused administrative demands to censor the publication.



Flatulence article leads to confiscation of Pennsylvania high school paper; firing of adviser

(02/01/00 12:00am)

Unfortunately, in the end, it will probably be remembered simply as the "Fart article" case. But it began on a much more serious note when school officials at Hatboro-Horsham High School outside Philadelphia banned publication of pro/con opinion columns on abortion, a story about the school district


New York community college newspaper back in business after 8-day shutdown

(02/01/00 12:00am)

The staff of a New York community college student newspaper is now back in its newsroom, following an eight-day shutdown that resulted from the paper's publication of a controversial advertisement. The staff of The Hudsonian was locked out of its office after the Hudson Valley Community College student senate objected to an advertisement for a strip club that the paper published in its Feb.



Texas Tech student newspaper fights off faculty takeover

(02/01/00 12:00am)

The students and faculty of Texas Tech University's School of Mass Communications thwarted a proposal in February that would have established a formal relationship between the school newspaper and the department. The original draft of the proposal, submitted by Jerry Hudson, director of the School of Mass Communications, would have placed the University Daily under the control of the School of Mass Communications and required a department staff member to serve as a "newsroom editor," as well as teach a journalism class.



March 2000 SPLC Speaking Engagements

(02/01/00 12:00am)

Student Press Law Center staff will appear at the following events during March: March 4: Southern Interscholastic Press Association convention, Columbia, S.C. March 6: Close-Up Foundation, Washington, D.C. March 10-11: Alabama Scholastic Press Association convention, Tuscaloosa, Ala. March 15-16: Columbia Scholastic Press Association convention, New York City March 16-17: Columbia Scholastic Press Association/College Media Adviser College convention, New York City March 31: College Newspaper Business and Advertising Managers convention, St.




Newspaper Thieves Take, Burn Maryland College Paper

(03/01/00 12:00am)

Newspaper thieves at Goucher College took several hundred copies of the Quindecim, the school's student paper and set fire to other stacks of the paper following the publication of a front-page article regarding problems with the school's student government. While no one has claimed responsibility for the acts and newspaper staffers acknowledge that there were other stories in the Feb.




Ohio College Editor Ordered to Quit Outside Job or Lose School Funding; Critics Cry Foul

(03/01/00 12:00am)

University of Toledo officials have given the editor in chief of the Collegian, UT's student newspaper, two choices: quit your outside job at the city newspaper or lose your university stipend. Collegian editor in chief Keith Tarjanyi, who also works as a temporary news assistant at The Toledo Blade, was informed through letters from UT's dean of students that he would have to quit his job at the local paper to continue being paid approximately $9,500 a year for his work on the school paper. A similar letter was sent to UT student Shannon Phillips, president of Campus Activities and Programming. While the policy against outside employment was on the books prior to the students assuming their campus roles, the policy was not clearly spelled out when he started as Collegian editor and has not been enforced against other students who have held outside jobs, according to Tarjanyi. UT officials have admitted that both students have performed their campus jobs well, but say that they are simply following university policy. At least some members of the UT community smell sour grapes and claim that the policy is being selectively enforced against Tarjanyi in response to editorials critical of the administration that have run in the Collegian. UT's faculty union, the American Association of University Professors, unanimously passed a resolution March 1 objecting to the school's actions. "UT-AAUP strongly supports the editorial independence of The Collegian and strenuously objects to the selective enforcement of the rules against the editor." Tarjanyi has vowed not to give up either position.