Search Results


Below are your search results. You can also try a Basic Search.




Rider tacked onto Wisconsin state budget would limit public access to searches for top university jobs

(06/10/15 3:05pm)

In a proposal slipped into the state budget that wasn't considered through the normal process for bills, Wisconsin legislators are proposing to repeal a requirement that makes public universities disclose the top five candidates for chancellor, president and other top positions. Instead, the public would be entitled only to the names of those "seriously considered," which might be just one name. Open-government advocates are decrying the maneuver as a step backward for public accountability.






Universities are taking divergent approaches to handling campus speech, safe spaces, and trigger warnings

(09/07/16 1:41pm)

On one campus, the administration has said in no uncertain terms that students expecting “trigger warnings” shouldn’t hold their breath. On another, a center for inclusivity is pushing a set of language recommendations called “Just Words,”... 


Student journalist challenges University of Wisconsin for records in investigation of professor

(08/15/17 5:28pm)

When a professor was pulled out of a lecture and suddenly stopped teaching his other classes, Alex Nemec, a student journalist at the University of Wisconsin at Oshkosh, filed records requests to find out why. Nemec has encountered two hurdles to accessing records, the first imposed by the University and the second by the professor himself.




TRANSPARENCY TUESDAY: Don't take "no" for a public-records answer -- and don't take "copyright," either

(02/28/12 6:15pm)

On occasion, people in positions of public authority know "just enough law to be dangerous" -- not enough to actually get the answer right, but enough to convince themselves that they have, because the answer has lots of authoritative-sounding words in it. This is the story of one such occasion. Recently, the SPLC attorney hotline received what started out as an unremarkable call from a college journalist whose request to a government agency for public records was denied.


TRANSPARENCY TUESDAY: This just in... lawyers have to obey the law

(01/08/13 10:09pm)

Like it or not, attorneys who work on contract for government agencies -- and, it turns out, even those whose payment flows through government agencies' insurance companies -- must let the public know what they're charging for. That's the bottom line of a new ruling from the Wisconsin Supreme Court that comes just a few months after courts in California and Ohio reached the same conclusion.


Student's "lewd" video about teacher provokes errant Wisconsin ruling applying "online harassment" law

(02/23/14 9:32pm)

Can derogatory remarks about a teacher be both constitutionally protected speech and also punishable as harassment? A Wisconsin appeals court appears to believe so. The Wisconsin Supreme Court is being asked to take up the case of "Kaleb K.," a 15-year-old student from Stevens Point, Wisc., who was arrested after posting a homemade rap on YouTube filled with profane, degrading language about his Spanish teacher. In September 2012, a juvenile-court judge declared Kaleb delinquent on the grounds of violating state criminal statutes against disorderly conduct and unlawful use of a computer communications system. In a ruling last November, the state Court of Appeals threw out the disorderly conduct charge, finding that Kaleb's lyrics, though distasteful, were not threatening, obscene or otherwise outside the boundaries of the First Amendment. But the court then went on to uphold the conviction under the state's computer-harassment law, which makes it a misdemeanor if a speaker "sends a message to [a] person on an electronic mail or other computerized communication system" that contains lewd or profane language "with the intent to harass, annoy, or offend." It's possible to harass someone even with a constitutionally protected message if the speech is delivered in an especially harassing manner.