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Independent paper at Louisiana State U. sues campus daily for unfair competition

(09/01/02 12:00am)

Claiming the campus student newspaper has created an unfair market for competition, the Tiger Weekly, an independent newspaper at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, has sued its school-sponsored counterpart, The Reveille.Tiger Weekly publisher Wayne Lewis said The Reveille is supposed to be used as a learning tool for the journalism program, not as a tool to thwart competition.



Study points to digital disconnect in nation's schools

(09/01/02 12:00am)

A growing number of computer-savvy students say teachers and administrators hamper educational benefits of Internet use through inadequate instruction, lack of access to computers and restrictive policies such as filtering software, according to a study released in August by the Pew Internet & American Life Project.Digital Disconnect , the term coined by the non-profit initiative of the Pew Research Center for People and the Press, is the "substantial disconnect" between how students use the Internet for homework and how they use it during the school day under teacher direction. Nearly 2,000 middle and high school students drawn from 36 different public schools participated in Pew-sponsored focus groups.




Federal judge recognizes Ohio h.s. paper as limited public forum; refuses newspaper's request for order prohibiting prior review

(02/01/03 12:00am)

In a significant legal victory for high school student media, a federal district court judge in Ohio this month ruled that some high school newspapers must be accorded greater legal protection than others.While Judge James S.




Congress provides funding for clery act compliance handbook

(02/01/03 12:00am)

Student journalists may gain access to more accurate campus crime information later this year after schools receive federal guidelines intended to provide detailed instruction for crime reporting.Congress approved $750,000 for the Department of Education to develop a handbook, which will outline obligations under the Jeanne Clery Act, as a part of the appropriations package passed Feb.


Tennessee, New Jersey lawmakers debate access to student records

(02/01/03 12:00am)

The Tennessee and New Jersey senates are both considering bills that will affect public access to student information.But that is where the similarities stop.A New Jersey Senate bill would prohibit the release of any information about anyone under the age of 18 without written consent from the minor's parents or legal guardian, unless individual municipalities passed laws to the contrary.



Texas superintendent arrested for withholding expense reports

(02/01/03 12:00am)

The Llano Independent School District superintendent was arrested Feb. 10 on charges of violating the Texas Public Information Act, concluding a three-month investigation by the state attorney general.Superintendent Jack Patton was arraigned in the 33rd District Court in Llano on two misdemeanor charges of "failure or refusal to provide access to or copying of public information." He paid the bond, which was set at $1,000.Patton could face up to six months in jail and a $1,000 fine for each count if convicted."The allegations made in this particular situation are very troubling and disappointing," Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott said.



Public domain images of the Iraq War available from DOD Web site

(03/01/03 12:00am)

Student media looking for images of the war have an alternative to downloading photos from commercial Web sites without permission, an act which generally violates federal copyright law, or paying license fees.The Department of Defense has posted dozens of photos of the Iraq war on its Web site . As with all work created by federal government employees or agencies, the files on the DOD site are in the public domain unless otherwise indicated and you do not need to seek permission prior to their use.


SPLC issues guidelines to journalists covering anti-war protests

(03/01/03 12:00am)

The Student Press Law Center has issued guidelines to student journalists involved in covering anti-war or other large protests to avoid being arrested or detained.Several student reporters and photographers were arrested while attempting to cover the World Bank/International Monetary Fund meetings in Washington, D.C., last September as were a handful of other student reporters at anti-war protests in Washington, D.C., and San Francisco this month (see story, below).To help avoid run-in's with police, the Center offers the following advice for college student media members planning to cover large-scale protests or rallies:1) Bring credentials.


Student journalists arrested while covering anti-war protests in Washington, San Francisco

(03/01/03 12:00am)

Two college newspaper photographers, along with four other students, were arrested while covering the anti-war march held in downtown Washington, D.C., on March 15 after they followed a group of protesters inside the World Bank headquarters and photographed them as they raised havoc, said one student's lawyer.During their first court appearance March 17, the charges of unlawful entry brought against the students were dismissed, according to Robert Becker, who represented one of the students at the request of the Washington, D.C., professional chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists.



Distribution bin, newspapers disappear at New York college

(03/01/03 12:00am)

The disappearance of a distribution bin containing at least 200 copies of The Student Voice, a student newspaper at the State University of New York at Albany, could be related to continued feuds with university staff regarding the placement of papers on campus, said Editor Tony Gray.Gray said when he returned from spring break, which was the first week of March, he learned that the bin in the Performing Arts Center was missing.


Students cry legal foul as Virginia university board adopts controversial resolutions without public notice

(03/01/03 12:00am)

The governing board at Virginia Tech ruffled feathers and may have broken freedom of information laws when it recently passed two resolutions without public notice.At its March 10 meeting, the Board of Visitors passed a "Non-Discrimination Resolution," which eliminated affirmative action in Tech's admission policy and removed sexual orientation from the written non-discrimination policy."[The board] voted in an open session but they didn't say what they were doing," said Brian McNeill, editor at Tech's paper, The Collegiate Times. "They didn't open it up for discussion or debate at all, publicly."Under its own bylaws, the board is subject to Virginia's freedom of information statutes, and its meetings are open to the public.