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Private university's police refuse to release records

(08/01/04 12:00am)

The Washington University Police Department told Student Life that because it is an agency of the private university, it is not required to follow the Missouri Sunshine Law.In a letter to editor in chief Jonathan Greenberger, a university official stated, “Washington University ...is not a ‘public governmental body.’ Therefore, the University is not subject to the Missouri Sunshine Law and other laws expressly applicable to public bodies, and the reports you seek are not open to public inspection,” Student Life reported.



Editors sue student council for closed meetings

(08/01/04 12:00am)

The Mirror’s former editor in chief Jessica Perciante, current editor in chief Heath Urie and current managing editor Christopher Marcheso allege that the university’s Student Representative Council and its president, Steve Gustafson, knowingly violated state open-meetings laws when they conducted closed-door meetings on Sept. 24, 2003, Nov. 19, 2003, and Feb. 4, 2004.




SPLC condemns censorship at Kansas State

(08/01/04 12:00am)

In July statement was in response to the actions of officials at Kansas State University in removing the student newspaper adviser based on the content decisions made by student editors. The SPLC has grave concerns about the legal arguments KSU officials are making about free press protections for students at the university. Those arguments are, quite simply, unprecedented, dangerous and offensive to the First Amendment.



Student editors sue university trustees over funding cut

(08/01/04 12:00am)

Three editors of a student newspaper are suing their university’s board of trustees, claiming that the board cut the newspaper’s funding because of its content.Editor in chief Heath Urie, managing editor Christopher Marcheso and news editor Andrew Rosenthal allege that the University of Northern Colorado Board of Trustees approved a recommendation to reduce of The Mirror’s funding by 40 percent because of articles that were critical of the board and the university’s Student Representative Council.





Fla. college suspends paper after students fight for control

(08/01/04 12:00am)

Since February, editors struggled with administrators over access to the school’s financial records and the use of the college’s logo on their business cards. The situation climaxed in March when editors printed an article — without their adviser’s approval — criticizing the lack of student activities on campus.



College officials trash student publications

(08/01/04 12:00am)

Copies of the La Roche Courier were distributed on April 14 and confiscated by college president Monsignor William Kerr three days later -- the same day prospective students and their parents toured the college during an open house.Kerr apparently confiscated the newspapers because of an editorial in the newspaper that advocated teaching students about safe sex, said Nicole Johnson, a student editor of the newspaper.





It's a jungle out there

(08/01/04 12:00am)

Georgia Dunn was not surprised when she learned that Ohio school districts performed poorly in an Ohio Coalition for Open Government study gauging compliance of the state’s open-records law. The audit’s results, released in June, showed school districts released records the same day or the next less than 30 percent of the time -- the lowest rate of any type of public body included in the statewide audit. Dunn, Ohio Journalism Education Association state director, said compliance with open-records laws has not been a high priority for schools.



Supreme Court says COPA is likely unconstitutional

(08/01/04 12:00am)

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled June 29 that a law designed to protect minors from Internet pornography was probably overbroad and unconstitutional, but sent the case back to a lower court to rule on whether new technological advances would make enforcement of the law feasible. In a 5-4 decision, the court ruled that a 1998 statute, which carried up to a $50,000 fine per day and jail time for anyone who exposed minors to harmful material online, threatened the First Amendment right to free speech if enforced.