State-by-state guide to the reporter's privilege for student media

Updated: Dec 19 2014

Reporter’s privilege laws vary by state. Some laws provide broad protection, shielding both unpublished and published information as well as confidential and non-confidential sources and information. Others are less protective. While most states have not had occasion to consider whether their reporters privilege law is applicable to student journalists, those that have have generally not distinguished between student and commercial media in extending the privilege to cover student reporters.

The following state-by-state (including the District of Columbia) guide represents the Student Press Law Center’s best guess regarding the applicability of reporter’s privilege laws to student news media. For a more general discussion regarding the use of reporters privilege laws, be sure to read our Student Media Guide to Reporter’s Privilege Law.

Click here to see the reporter's privilege guide for Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho and Illinois.

Click here to see the reporter's privilege guide for Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri and Montana.

Click here to see the reporter's privilege guide for Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon and Pennsylvania.

Click here to see the reporter's privilege guide for Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming